By Joanna Dupont-Inglis, EuropaBio Deputy Secretary General

Companies focusing on industrial biotechnology (IB) and bioeconomy are contributing towards achieving 11 out of 17 SDGs, enabling smarter and more efficient use of precious natural resources, developing renewable alternatives to traditional fossil-carbon products, helping to mitigate the impacts of climate change, reducing energy consumption and man-made emissions to soil, air, and water.

Joanna Dupont-Inglis

These are the main results of our new report about the impact of industrial biotech towards meeting global challenges. IB uses enzymes and micro-organisms to make bio-based products in sectors such as chemicals, bio-based plastics, bio-based lubricants, bio-based solvents, food and feed, detergents, paper and pulp, textiles, as well as bioenergy, such as biofuels and biogas. It also plays an important role in bioremediation through water purification and soil recovery. As such, IB is increasingly recognised by a growing community of stakeholders as playing an important role in responding to some of the greatest global challenges and helping to achieve objectives under the UN’s SDG framework.

It is now critical for Europe to develop a more competitive and sustainable bioeconomy. To this end, the EU’s ‘Horizon Europe’ proposal will be key to ensuring that the right investments in innovation are made to address societal challenges and deliver on the UN SDGs. I invite you to read the new EuropaBio report, which also includes policy recommendations for the EU.

 

You can read the full article from Joanna in our special edition being distributed at this month’s World Congress on Industrial Biotechnology in Philadelphia, which will also be online from 16 July.