The eight locations across Europe that will house the continent’s first supercomputer centres have been announced. These facilities will give ‘researchers, industry and businesses’ the tools to accelerate advancements in ‘personalised medicine, drug and material design, bio-engineering, weather forecasting, and climate change’.

In a bid to make Europe the global capital of supercomputing, the European High-Performance Computing Joint Undertaking – EuroHPC – has picked eight different Member States as hosts. There are 19 of the 28 EU nations participating in the Joint Undertaking with a total budget, including EU funds, of €840 million.

“These sites will give our researchers access to world-class supercomputers, a strategic resource for the future of European industry. They will be able to process their data inside the EU, not outside it. It is a major step forward for Europe to reach the next level of computing capacity; it will help us to advance in future-oriented technologies like the Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, robotics and data analytics,” said Andrus Ansip, European Commission Vice-President for the Digital Single Market.

The hosting sites are: Sofia (Bulgaria), Ostrava (Czechia), Kajaani (Finland), Bologna (Italy), Bissen (Luxembourg), Minho (Portugal), Maribor (Slovenia), and Barcelona (Spain).