Connect with us

Subscribe

technology

Wearable enables legally blind to see

Digital vision concept, abstract illustration with chaotic structures mixed with human eye

|16 February 2017|

North America

The legally blind can see again thanks to game-changing wearable technology.

eSight electronic glasses enable those who are legally blind, or have low vision, to take part in sport, watch television, go for a walk and do all the other things people with normal sight do every day.

Labeled an “engineering breakthrough” eSight “is a unique wearable medical device that enhances the functional vision of a person who has low vision or is legally blind,” according to the company’s website.

“eSight houses a high-speed, high-definition camera that captures everything the user is looking at. eSight’s algorithms enhance the video feed and display it on two, OLED screens in front of the user’s eyes. Full color video images are clearly seen by the eSight user with unprecedented visual clarity and virtually no lag.”

Founder Conrad Lewis, an engineer, was inspired to develop the breakthrough tech by his two sisters – both are legally blind.

He said: “If I can assemble teams of engineers who can build incredible products for the commercial market, why not assemble an engineering team that can build electronic glasses that would let my sisters see?”

While eSight can’t currently help those who are profoundly or totally blind – a figure put at less than 15% of the 300 million people worldwide categorised as blind by the World Health Organisation, “eSight works for most” of the remaining group.

Newsletter Signup

Iain Robertson
Written By

Iain is an experienced writer, journalist and lecturer, who held editorships with a number of business focussed publications before co-founding and becoming editor of Innovators Magazine. Iain is also the strategic director for OnePoint5Media.

Advertisement

sign language wearable sign language wearable

Wearable translates sign language

biotech

sight sight

Blindness cure in sight

biotech

Heart attack early warning system

technology

Could tattoo ink cure blindness?

biotech

Connect
Newsletter Signup