“This could become an effective new weapon that kills cancer” are words we all want to hear.

And they can be attributed to Steve Kay, USC Provost Professor of Neurology, Biomedical Engineering and Biological Sciences, about a new drug that could help call time on cancer. In research undertaken by scientists from the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience and Nagoya University’s Institute of Transformative BioMolecules (ITbM), scientists used our circadian rhythms to ‘stunt’ the growth of cancer cells. Tests on ‘human kidney cancer cells and on acute myeloid leukemia in mice’ showed that circadian clocks of cancerous cells can be altered to kill them.

 

“In some cancers, the disease takes over the circadian clock mechanism and uses it for the evil purpose of helping itself grow,” explained Steve Kay. “With the GO289 molecule, we can interfere with those processes and stop the cancer from growing. This could become an effective new weapon that kills cancer.”

 

The research was published in the journal Science Advances.