Connect with us

Subscribe

technology

New collaboration will create life-changing technology

|17 May 2016|

USA

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University has entered into a collaboration with ReWalk Robotics to accelerate the development of the Institute’s lightweight, wearable soft exosuit technologies for assisting people with lower limb disabilities. The agreement with ReWalk will help speed the design of assistive exosuits that could help patients suffering from stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS) to regain mobility.

“This is a very exciting day for the soft exosuit technology,” said Conor Walsh, Ph.D., who is a Core Faculty Member at the Wyss Institute, and Founder of the Harvard Biodesign Lab. “ReWalk brings commercialisation expertise and experience in the area of wearable robotics and complements our translation-focused research. Ultimately this agreement paves the way for this technology to make its way to patients.”

The soft exosuit – which is a soft wearable robot that is the first of its kind – was developed at the Wyss Institute by Walsh and his team through extensive prototyping that included the involvement of roboticists, mechanical and biomechanical engineers, apparel designers, and software engineers.

“There is a great need in the health care system for lightweight, lower-cost wearable exoskeleton designs to support stroke patients, individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and senior citizens who require mechanical mobility assistance. This collaboration will help create the next generation of exoskeleton systems, making life-changing technology available to millions of consumers across a host of patient populations,” said Larry Jasinski, CEO of ReWalk.

Newsletter Signup

Iain Robertson
Written By

Iain is an experienced writer, journalist and lecturer, who held editorships with a number of business focussed publications before co-founding and becoming editor of Innovators Magazine. Iain is also the strategic director for OnePoint5Media.

Advertisement

sign language wearable sign language wearable

Wearable translates sign language

biotech

frontier tech frontier tech

COVID-19 AI repository

technology

Heart attack early warning system

technology

Robots to learn kitchen skills

food | water

Connect
Newsletter Signup