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biotech

New breakthrough cancer treatments on the horizon

New analysis released today by the Wellcome Sanger Institute will make it possible to speed up the development of drugs that can kill cancer cells. The Institute’s novel study of cancer cells led to the pinpointing of 370 previously overlooked drug targets capable of tackling common cancers.

Dr Mathew Garnett, co-lead author of the study at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and Open Targets, said: “Our work uncovers 370 candidate priority targets for tackling the most prevalent cancers, including breast, lung and colon cancers. This work exploits the latest in genomics and computational biology to understand how we can best target cancer cells. This will help drug developers focus their efforts on the highest value targets to bring new medicines to patients more quickly.”

The research has been described as a ‘leap towards a new generation of smarter, more effective cancer treatments’.

“Two people might have the same type of cancer, but their diseases can behave differently. That is why we need precision medicine,” adds Dr Marianne Baker, science engagement manager at Cancer Research UK. “This ambitious work is a compelling example of research informing drug discovery from the start, paving the way for more effective precision cancer therapies. Giving people treatments for their unique cancer can improve the odds of success and help more people affected by cancer live longer, better lives.”

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Susan is the co-founder of Innovators Magazine and a consultant for OnePoint5Media. Susan is also a member of the UNFCCC-led Resilience Frontiers Nexus group and the Chair of the APOPO Foundation UK board.

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