(STOCKHOLM)

Countries around the world are making a concerted effort to develop sustainable food ecosystems that are robust enough to feed a rapidly growing population.

The Food Sustainability Index, from the Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition Foundation (BCFN Foundation) – launched at the EAT Stockholm Food Forum – looked at food and nutrition performance across 25 countries that account for around two thirds of the global population.

It puts France ahead of the rest, followed by Japan and Canada. Countries were judged on 58 criteria linked to three pillars: sustainable agriculture, nutritional challenges and food waste.

France came out on top because of its innovative efforts in tackling food waste and promoting healthy eating habits.

“Today all countries are called to face a big challenge: achieving the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. Many Countries are suffering of obesity, other of undernutrition; food and water are wasted every day and agriculture is damaging our environment. There is more than good food and taste. Considering that we all share and consume the resources of the same Planet, we urgently need to change the current models of world development by increasing collective consciousness. It is essential to act right now with the aim to solve this situation as soon as possible. One of the most important initiative of the BCFN Foundation is to make sure that human kind and every single person have the possibility to make informed choices about their lifestyles,” explained Luca Virginio, Vice President of BCFN during his keynote speech at the EAT Stockholm Food Forum.

“This is why the Barilla Foundation launched the Food Sustainability Index and still works with the Economist Intelligence Unit to present a new and updated version of the Index in 2017. This project represents an important tool to allow people to understand and discover where around the world one eats better in terms of food system sustainability. In this sense, BCFN is also strongly committed to involve institutions, civil society, NGO’s and policy makers in a major food and sustainability debate.”