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AI can ‘benefit humankind’

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has the potential to ‘benefit humankind and its environment’, according to a new study.

The report – Harnessing Artificial Intelligence for the Earth, was published last week by PwC and the World Economic Forum (WEF). It complements WEF’s Fourth Industrial Revolution for the Earth initiative, which targets the advancement of tech than can help overcome ‘environmental challenges’.

“The opportunity for AI to be harnessesd to benefit humankind and its environment is substantial. As we think about the gains, efficiencies and new solutions this creates for nations, business and for everyday life, we must also think about how to maximise gains for society and our environment. It means a collaborative effort between policy makers, business, investors and researchers, which makes this study’s research and recommendations all the more compelling,” said Dominic Waughray, Head of Public-Private Partnership, Member of the Executive Committee.

The report suggests how AI can be used to tackle challenges linked to ‘climate change; biodiversity and conservation; healthy oceans; water security; clean air; weather and disaster resilience’. And it recommends the actions that governments, companies, institutions, investors and startups should take to ensure the potential of the technology is properly harnessed in these areas.

“The opportunity for AI to be harnessed to benefit humankind and its environment is substantial. The intelligence and productivity gains that AI will deliver can unlock new solutions to society’s most pressing environmental challenges,” the report’s conclusion states.

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